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> What does an injured or scared calf sound like?
OregonDave
post Aug 13 2004, 08:03 AM
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I've seen does come charging into a predator call being blown to sound like a fawn crying but what about a calf? I don't mean a lost calf sound but one that is truly scared or in pain. Anybody ever hear what it sounds like or have an idea how to mimic it? High pitched squealing with a diaphram? If cows would react like deer do it could be a pretty handy sound to know how to make.
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BrokenHorn
post Aug 13 2004, 11:04 PM
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Elknut, here is your oportunity to expound.

Paul talks about a calf distress sound in his video. And he states that the elk (at least cows) will come to help.

Hopefuly he will post up.
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will merritt
post Aug 14 2004, 03:22 AM
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I've pesonally wittnessed a bear attacking a calf. The soun that it made was almost shrilling. the calf while being attacked chirped loud and fast. The cows responded to this charging down the hill. evven the bull fallowed close by( bugling at his cows i guess.) When the bear caught the calf it screamed a lot like a fawn only deeper in pitch. The cows wern't as interested when it started to ball as they were when it was chirping frantically. Hope this helps. Good luck!!!! Hopefully they dont shut the woods down for fire danger. I was talking to a state oficcial on our job site and he said they are thinking about it for oregon :cry:
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Elknut1
post Aug 14 2004, 04:42 AM
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Picture with your ears what a child would sound like if it was going to be beat up and needed help or was already hurting. A calf or cow in distress sound can start with nervousness and elevate to panicky sounding or downright painful.

It can be rapid sounding and high painful type pitches to it. Of course depending on the severity of the problem would also depend on the level of distress sounds you would hear or make.

As you know a calf mew or calf talk is immature in volume compared to a mature cow, such as a spike squeal would differ from a mature bull bugle. Keep that in mind along with the other thoughts. elknut1
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Elknut1
post Aug 17 2004, 02:45 AM
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As far as true distress sounds go by either a cow or calf, there is no set pattern to them, the sounds are very random as well as high pitched almost screeching in sound. They're high, low, long, short, medium and so on, absolutely uncontrollable. ----Similar to what Will Merrit experienced! These are true distress type sounds. The ones Chris described, and very well I might add!! Are seperated or lost calf sounds, and yes they can become very quick in repetition almost panicky or urgent, but yet there's a pattern to the sounds and easily imitated, that is not a distress sound or one of pain involved.

I'll give you an example of a distress sound I wittnessed between a cow & a sattelite bull. While archery hunting several years ago I was closing in on a herd of elk, the bulls were very vocal and the herd bull had his hands full with a couple of raggys challenging him for breeding rights, while he was busy a smallish 5-point snuck in and tried to hook a cow out of the harem about 80yds from the herd bull, she resisted him with squealing like you never heard, (I thought!!!) In turn, he instantly gave a gutteral growl followed with short fast huffing grunts. (almost ape like) He then reached over and bit her so hard on the neck and partially drug her, I swear I could see blood on her neck, you should've heard the sounds that came out of her mouth, now those were distressed, coming from every imaginable direction with no rhyme or reason to them. The herd bull reacted instantly to the situation and ran the 5-point off. Hence The Threat was born. <GRIN> Anyway I though I'd add that tidbit and to make sure there was no confusion to what a calf or cow in distress sound was. I realize there can be different levels of this sound, but nonetheless it stands alone compared to all other cow or calf sounds made!! ElkNut1
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Elknut1
post Aug 21 2004, 11:15 PM
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Chris---Very Good Post!!

I totally agree with your sound reasoning on why & when to use such calls as seperated or lost calf or cow calls. Yes, there are defenitley different levels of distress type calls for either one as well! These are the ones more suitable for hunting situations, where as extreme levels of distress sounds are rarely entertained.

The only reason I mentioned the higher leveled ones was because of Oregon Daves question about distress sounds inflicted by pain. Other than that I don't reccomend to take calf sounds to the exterme as I would certain cow sounds.

Those of you who have Worse Than Wolves know what the different levels of both calf & cow sounds are, that are effective for hunting situations. It also shares what they sound like. Good Luck to all this year and have a safe hunt!!!-ElkNut1
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