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> Blacktail Vs. Mule Deer
hunterfishman
post Jan 13 2009, 07:29 PM
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so what exactly is the difference? Besides the color of the tail, Is there realy much difference between the two? I hunt mule deer, and I've seen more blacktail videos than I can remember. I just dont see the difference! Its like trying to point out the differences in a dessert mule deer and a rocky mt mule deer. besides knowing that they live in different areas. I'm refering to the body structure and habbits of the two. If a blacktail is closer related to the mule deer than a whitetail, than why does it have a name more simalar to the whitetail than the mule deer? blink.gif just thought I'd throw this out there and see what you all have to say on the subject.
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Central Oregon Bowhunter
post Jan 13 2009, 07:36 PM
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If I am correct to this if im not can someone correct me but the blacktail is part of the mule deer and whitetail deer family, and I think the antlers are darker then a muley and blact tails don't live in high or low desserts that I know and thats about all I know on them

This post has been edited by Central Oregon Bowhunter: Jan 13 2009, 07:37 PM
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moose horn
post Jan 13 2009, 09:35 PM
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Blacktails are a smaller cousin to the mule deer plus as you know the blacktail lives mostly on the coast side of the cascade mts. where the mule deer lives on the east side. Mule deer like more open ground and the Blacktail lives in more forested and around the edge of open fields which makes the Blacktail harder to hunt than the mule deer.
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Oregon Turkey Hunter
post Jan 14 2009, 02:08 AM
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if you look at the ears the mule deer they tend to droop a lot more than black tail


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hunterfishman
post Jan 14 2009, 08:27 AM
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QUOTE(Central Oregon Bowhunter @ Jan 13 2009, 01:36 PM) *

If I am correct to this if im not can someone correct me but the blacktail is part of the mule deer and whitetail deer family, and I think the antlers are darker then a muley and blact tails don't live in high or low desserts that I know and thats about all I know on them

((( EVERY ONE SHOULD READ THIS)))

whitetail:
class: Mammalia, order:artiodactyla.
family:cervidae, sub family:capriolinae, genus:Odocoilius, species: virginianus.
It gets its name from its white tail, seen when its running away. thats a given.


Columbian Blacktail Deer:

Columbian blacktail deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) are the subspecies of blacktails native to the Bay Area and normally inhabit a 100-mile-wide band of woodlands and chaparral-covered coastal mountains extending inland from the Pacific Ocean, from the Queen Charlotte Islands in British Columbia south to Santa Barbara in Southern California. A second blacktail subspecies, the stockier and shorter-faced Sitka (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis), lives farther north in the rain forests of southeast Alaska and north-coastal British Columbia


mule deer:
class: mammalia, order:artiodactyla.
family:cervidae, sub family:capriolinae, genus:Odocoilius, species: hemionus.
gets its name from its mule like ears. also a given

dessert mule deer:
odocoilius hemionus crooki.

rocky mt. mule deer:
odocoilius hemionus hemionus.

RANGE:
Western North America have true Rocky Mountain Mule Deer in the Rockies, black-tailed deer are on the Pacific Coast and desert mule deer are in northern Mexico and southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas

A New Cervid Family Tree

Until quite recently, the majority of wildlife biologists classified Columbian blacktails as a subspecies of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus). Even the National Audubon Society in its authoritative Field Guide to North American Mammals (1996) listed Columbian blacktails as mule deer. True, like mule deer, Columbian blacktails have very large ears that rotate independently to listen for danger in all directions, but there the obvious similarities end. In Mule Deer Country (1999), Professor Valerius Geist of the University of Calgary explains how recent genetic analysis seems to confirm what the Lewis and Clark expedition reported back to Thomas Jefferson on first encountering them in Washington State in 1805: Blacktails are a distinct species. According to Geist, our local deer are actually the result of more than 10 million years of cervid evolutionary development. This reevaluation is extraordinary when you consider that blacktails have been among the most studied wildlife species in California, with data for some herds dating back to the early 20th century.

All three major deer species native to North America (blacktail, whitetail, and mule) trace their ancestry back to a primordial, rabbit-size Odocoileus, which had fangs and no antlers and lived around the Arctic Circle some 10 million years ago. After testing the mitochondrial DNA (DNA on the maternal side) of all three species, researchers theorized that whitetails (Odocoileus virginianus) emerged as a separate species on the East Coast about 3.5 million years ago. They apparently expanded their range down the East Coast and then westward across the continent until reaching the Pacific Ocean in what is now California, some 1.5 million years ago. Moving north up the coast, they evolved into blacktails. Then, a very interesting process of crossbreeding and hybridization began to take place, fusing social behavior with genetics.

Near the end of the Pleistocene, some 11,000 years ago, as the glacial ice receded from the Sierra passes, blacktails moving east from their traditional homes in the coastal valleys of California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia began to encounter a second wave of whitetails expanding their range westward across the Great Plains. It is now believed that subsequent back-and-forth crossbreeding resulted in the various strains of mule deer scattered across California and the western United States that are now considered examples of species-in-the-making, none over 11,000 years old.

I hope this helps every one understand the difference and similalarities in the deer we hunt!
I spent all night researching this topic. your welcome! biggrin.gif
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Central Oregon Bowhunter
post Jan 14 2009, 06:25 PM
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Thats pretty neat but I don't believe in the millions of years, but thats what I think
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hunterfishman
post Jan 14 2009, 09:18 PM
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QUOTE(Central Oregon Bowhunter @ Jan 14 2009, 12:25 PM) *

Thats pretty neat but I don't believe in the millions of years, but thats what I think



ya. theres realy no way to tell an exact time line huh? I just thought I would include it in the information cus thats what was writen word for word in the article I read by bay nature institute. but at least we know now that the deer we hunt today started as a pure breed of whitetail and mule deer, and has since then cross bred into what we all know now as different sub-species & cross breeds of whitetail,blacktail,& mule deer! I spent all night reacearching this subject. It was well worth loosing sleep over! cool.gif
studying wildlife is my passion and I do everything in my power to further my understanding of it. It consumes my every day life and wouldnt have it any other way!
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Central Oregon Bowhunter
post Jan 14 2009, 09:20 PM
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Have you ever thought about becoming a state wildlife biologist? sounds like something you would have fun in.
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TomS
post Jan 15 2009, 04:30 PM
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Check out a blacktails face, too. They have a dark "unibrow" across their forehead - I know, not a major difference, but it is a difference. Genetically, I have no idea if a blacktail is closer to a whitetail of a mule deer or either.


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bowhunter-boy
post Feb 21 2009, 05:09 PM
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blacktails don't get nearly as big as mule generally. Here is a pic of my dads blacktail, it qualifies as columbian and western blacktail. It scored I think 128, and that is pretty dang big for a blacktail. Its also a good shot of the head so you can look at any differences.
http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u7/snow...ro/PA260011.jpg


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