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> Shooting Bows From Treestand?, do I need a lot of practice?
JYawn
post Aug 5 2008, 05:12 PM
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I just got my first bow set up and have been practicing but I need to know how much of a difference there will be once I'm up in a tree. What kind of differences are there to know about and practice for?


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I Hunt 365
post Aug 5 2008, 06:18 PM
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Yes, practice.... it can't hurt... as far as how much practice you need, that will be different for every hunter...

Basically there are a few things you need to know about shooting out of a stand. First the bow will shoot the same, so if something is not working right it's YOU 99% of the time. What most people do wrong when shooting from a stand is changing their form by not bending at the waist. You can't just point your arm holding the bown down while you stand or sit straight up... this changes everything. Everything from the waist up has to stay the same in order to keep the angles of the sights and peep all lined up, and at severe angles can it can also affect your lenght of pull. Moving your arms downward will also create alot of torque on the grip and the string, and will likely cause the string to make contact with your body or clothes as it shoots. Make sure you bend at the waist so that your arms are still coming out at perfect right angles to your body just like when on the ground.

The second thing that affects alot of people when shooting from a tree stand is being able to judge distances correctly. It doesn't do you any good to shoot well if you use a 30 yard pin for a 18 yard shot... practice from your stand height and learn to judge distances.

Those two things will affect hitting your target... but there are two more things to know when shooting at an actual deer.

The margin or error gets smaller as the angle of shot gets steeper, so be careful on shots that are too close, so quartered, or to steep, cause you can get deflection from the broadhead blades and the target is very small.

Second, alot of people don't know where to aim on a live deer b/c they only have shot at targets... don't always aim right behind the shoulder closest to you. Instead, aim "through" the deer right behind the far shoulder... If you always try to make your arrow exit low behind the far shoulder, you will be in the vitals no matter the angle.
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bucks&ducks78
post Aug 5 2008, 06:42 PM
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QUOTE(I Hunt 365 @ Aug 5 2008, 12:18 PM) *

Yes, practice.... it can't hurt... as far as how much practice you need, that will be different for every hunter...

Basically there are a few things you need to know about shooting out of a stand. First the bow will shoot the same, so if something is not working right it's YOU 99% of the time. What most people do wrong when shooting from a stand is changing their form by not bending at the waist. You can't just point your arm holding the bown down while you stand or sit straight up... this changes everything. Everything from the waist up has to stay the same in order to keep the angles of the sights and peep all lined up, and at severe angles can it can also affect your lenght of pull. Moving your arms downward will also create alot of torque on the grip and the string, and will likely cause the string to make contact with your body or clothes as it shoots. Make sure you bend at the waist so that your arms are still coming out at perfect right angles to your body just like when on the ground.

The second thing that affects alot of people when shooting from a tree stand is being able to judge distances correctly. It doesn't do you any good to shoot well if you use a 30 yard pin for a 18 yard shot... practice from your stand height and learn to judge distances.

Those two things will affect hitting your target... but there are two more things to know when shooting at an actual deer.

The margin or error gets smaller as the angle of shot gets steeper, so be careful on shots that are too close, so quartered, or to steep, cause you can get deflection from the broadhead blades and the target is very small.

Second, alot of people don't know where to aim on a live deer b/c they only have shot at targets... don't always aim right behind the shoulder closest to you. Instead, aim "through" the deer right behind the far shoulder... If you always try to make your arrow exit low behind the far shoulder, you will be in the vitals no matter the angle.

All great advice.


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m gardner
post Aug 6 2008, 03:28 AM
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All true, but no one mentioned ranging from an elevated position. If possible range landmarks from the ground and use that yardage or use an arc compensating rangefinder. You are shooting the base(distance from the base of the tree to the deer) of the triangle and you'll range the hypotenuse(distance from your stand to the deer). Same if you're shooting down or uphill. You'll be shooting a shorter range in any case. A quick formula at 25 degree angle is the [hypotenuse-(hypotenuse/10)], the formula at 45 degrees is [hypotenuse-(3Xhypotenuse/10)]. So if I'm at a 25 degree angle approximately and range the deer at 40 yards I subtract 40/10 from 40 and get 36 yards and shoot him for 36 yards. At 45 degrees I' shoot him for 28 yards. All this makes my head hurt. I think next year I'll get an arc compensating rangefinder instead.
Mark

This post has been edited by m gardner: Aug 6 2008, 03:30 AM


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187Elk
post Aug 6 2008, 05:44 AM
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If you remember to bend at the waist you are fine. If you don't your anchor point changes and no range finder will help you. Don't drop your arm to shoot down, bend at the waist keeping a 90 degree angle between your ribs and your arm.


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bucks&ducks78
post Aug 6 2008, 08:31 PM
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QUOTE(m gardner @ Aug 5 2008, 09:28 PM) *

All true, but no one mentioned ranging from an elevated position. If possible range landmarks from the ground and use that yardage or use an arc compensating rangefinder. You are shooting the base(distance from the base of the tree to the deer) of the triangle and you'll range the hypotenuse(distance from your stand to the deer). Same if you're shooting down or uphill. You'll be shooting a shorter range in any case. A quick formula at 25 degree angle is the [hypotenuse-(hypotenuse/10)], the formula at 45 degrees is [hypotenuse-(3Xhypotenuse/10)]. So if I'm at a 25 degree angle approximately and range the deer at 40 yards I subtract 40/10 from 40 and get 36 yards and shoot him for 36 yards. At 45 degrees I' shoot him for 28 yards. All this makes my head hurt. I think next year I'll get an arc compensating rangefinder instead.
Mark

This is all true, but much more complicated than you really need to know. Just know that the actual range is the horizontal range, so it is the distance that it would be from the base of your tree on level ground. I've hunted from treestands for a lot of years and unless you are putting your stands at really high altitudes, 25 ft+, or your tree is on a steep hill, it's not going to make a big enough difference to worry about it. The biggest difference would be on the extremely close shots where your bow shoots practically flat anyway and should have virtually the same impact point from about 5 yards to 22 or 23 yards. If you worry about it, the easiest way to conquer the problem is simply to take your range to a tree where you expect the animal to be, but range the tree at the same level that you are at, so instead of taking your range to the base of the tree where the animal will be standing take a range on the tree 20 ft up the trunk on the same level as your stand.

This post has been edited by bucks&ducks78: Aug 6 2008, 08:32 PM


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I Hunt 365
post Aug 6 2008, 09:54 PM
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QUOTE(m gardner @ Aug 5 2008, 09:28 PM) *

All true, but no one mentioned ranging from an elevated position. If possible range landmarks from the ground and use that yardage or use an arc compensating rangefinder. You are shooting the base(distance from the base of the tree to the deer) of the triangle and you'll range the hypotenuse(distance from your stand to the deer). Same if you're shooting down or uphill. You'll be shooting a shorter range in any case. A quick formula at 25 degree angle is the [hypotenuse-(hypotenuse/10)], the formula at 45 degrees is [hypotenuse-(3Xhypotenuse/10)]. So if I'm at a 25 degree angle approximately and range the deer at 40 yards I subtract 40/10 from 40 and get 36 yards and shoot him for 36 yards. At 45 degrees I' shoot him for 28 yards. All this makes my head hurt. I think next year I'll get an arc compensating rangefinder instead.
Mark



No one mentioned it? How did I not mention it???? blink.gif huh.gif

That's exactly my point at learning how to judge distances correctly... that it doesn't do any good to shoot straight if you use a 30 yard pin on an 18 yard shot... I was trying to keep it simple.... this is why it's hard to judge distances. Cause you know it looks 30 yards, and the reason is b/c it is 30 yards from your eye to the target, however, you don't need to shoot for 30 yards, you only need to shoot for actual horizontal distance, which will be shorter... guess I should have used the word "range"

C'mon M Gardner... I know you are old but..... LOL biggrin.gif wink.gif
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peter/pmr
post Aug 8 2008, 03:42 PM
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I practice out of a treestand set up in my backyard and of the upper deck of my house at all diferent ranges,BUT,as there always is, I use a range finder to pin point my yardage!Set your stand up in your hunting spot and get in your stand and take some flagging tape in three different colors and find your 10,20,30,and 40 yard marks and have a buddy tie the colors to a limb above the spot were you have open shooting lanes!That's what I do so I don't have to waste time digging out my range finder and ranging the deer when I should be concentrating on shot and form!I us the same color flagging as my pins so its easier to match up!This is what happens as you get older your memory recall starts to go!Be sure and use the colored flagging its quick and easy!


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m gardner
post Aug 8 2008, 03:54 PM
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Yeah, I'm getting old and wrinkly laugh.gif laugh.gif , but I'll be going on another high country deer/elk hunt in a week. On foot. Good thing my body still works better than my mind! rolleyes.gif The thing I know about shooting from a tree or high angle above an animal is that for angles not exceeding 30 degrees that the problem of the arrow hitting higher compensates itself because it gives you the perfect hold to center the vitals at the angle. You need to hold a bit higher to center the vitals on a downhill shot and having that 40 yard shot really being a 36 yard shot does this for you. That's why some tree stand hunters are convinced there is no difference. Try an uphill shot sometime.
Mark

This post has been edited by m gardner: Aug 8 2008, 03:56 PM


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